Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Life After a Custody Order

Are you in the divorce process and have questions about life after a custody order? Contact our Callagy Law attorneys to get started today.

Determining Child Custody

Life After a Custody OrderThe short answer to any of those questions is grandparents don’t have independent rights to visit their grandchildren and certainly not independent custody rights to their grandchildren. The only time or the only situation where you might have a grandparent assume custody or be granted guardianship over a grandchild is if both parents in some way aren’t able to care for their children, where there’s drug or alcohol issues or there’s incarceration issues, and they’re really looking to the next of kin to care for those children. Grandparents sometimes come into that.

If a grandparent is just becoming involved in a divorce matter with two parents that are involved and loving and caring, they don’t have an independent right to visitation and certainly doesn’t have an independent right to custody of the children. A grandparent’s access or ability to see their grandchildren is going to be when that parent, their son or their daughter, has their children. They don’t have any independent rights.

How Judges Determine Custody

Custody has two components. There is a legal aspect of it and there’s a residential aspect of it. The legal aspect is the joint and sole custody, and that’s the legal decision-making authority with regard to the health, education and welfare of the children. The residential aspect of it is how much time you’re actually physically spending with the children. When we’re talking about custody, it gets divided up between those two things and the court has to consider different things on both of those equations.

On the legal aspect of the custody, the sole versus joint, the court’s going to really look at how the parents get along, how they communicate. Are they able to co-parent? Are they talking together? Are they making decisions jointly together? Are they working together? Therefore, we can have joint legal custody, where the parents can share and communicate and make those decisions together.

On a residential side, an actual physical part of being with the children, the court is going to look at what’s in the best interest of the children, how often parents are working these issues out. How close do they live to each other? Can we get a 50/50 schedule, where we’re seeing the kids equal time? Geographically, we can make that work and that’s in the children’s best interest. Again, that goes to if the parents can get along. Are we going to be able to communicate and make things work to have a 50/50 schedule, or is it more of a traditional alternate weekends and a couple dinner visits during the week? Is that really what’s in the children’s best interest?

Ultimately, of the statutory factors that a court has to consider in custody, both legal and residential, it’s going to come down to what’s in the children’s best interest.

Your Right to Parenting Time

My heart goes out to those people where they’re not allowed to see their children, and we try to rectify that right away. There’s nothing more important than a relationship between children and their parents, and we try and protect that at all costs.

Presuming that there is no justifiable or reality-based reason why that parent cannot see the children – it’s not an abuse situation, there’s not a neglect situation, there’s nothing like that – just a refusal by one parent to allow the other parent to see the children and that refusal is unreasonable, then we need to rectify that quickly. We may need to get the court involved quickly and file an application to have immediate parenting time with the children. Whatever that schedule looks like, we would have to talk about it – if it’s overnights, if it’s 50/50, and what that means – and we’re going to have to get into court really fast to have a judge address this quickly. The last thing you want to do is let that go on or prolong that because then you get stuck in the situation of, “You let this go on for too long. You didn’t really want to see the kids, and now you’re coming back and you want to see them.”

If there’s a parent refusing to allow parenting time and that refusal is unjustifiable and unreasonable, you need to get into court quick. We need to get the judge to address that, and we need to get that client to exercise parenting time right away.

Types of Child Custody

In New Jersey, parenting time simply replaced what used to be called visitation. In New Jersey, we have two types of custody – legal custody and residential custody. In the vast majority of cases, our clients share joint legal custody of their children, which means they make decisions jointly for the child regarding health, education and welfare. Residential custody comes down to where the child is spending most of his or her time. If mom has the child most of the time and dad has alternate weekends and a mid-week dinner or overnight, mom has residential custody and would be called the parent of primary residence, and dad would be called the parent of alternate residence. His time with the children is called parenting time, what used to be called visitation.


Are you or a loved one in the divorce process and have questions about life after a custody order? Contact an experienced family law attorney at Callagy Law today for a free consultation and case evaluation.

Let our experience fight for you and your family.

Like Us on Facebook