Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

3 Family Law Claim Tips

Are you or a loved one in the divorce process? Read our 3 family law tips for guidance, then call our Callagy Law attorneys to get started.

1) Cohabitation

3 Family Law Claim TipsCohabitation is defined as an intimate personal relationship in which the couple shares duties and privileges normally associated with a marriage or civil union. That is the legal definition. When cohabitation exists, a former spouse has the ability to seek a termination or suspension of alimony that’s being paid.

People often wonder how they can prove cohabitation. It’s not always an easy thing to prove. We look at things like social media. We will go on Facebook pages, and we’ll see if the couple is vacationing together, if they’re recognized in their social circles as a couple, if they’re at special events together. We will oftentimes hire a private investigator to conduct surveillance and go to a household and see if it’s a boyfriend that is mowing the lawn or doing repairs around the household or other kind of household chores that you would normally associate with a married couple or a civil union.

We’ll also look to intertwined finances. That takes a next step that has to go to the court process, but if they’re sharing expenses, if there’s a joint bank account, if a vehicle is registered at an address, we’ll look at those things to prove cohabitation. Importantly, cohabitation does not mean that they are living together. We do not have to show that they have a common household. It is not something that is critical in proving cohabitation that they are actually living together.

2) Should I Mediate My Family Law Issues?

People ask all the time if they should mediate their family law issues. The answer is, absolutely. You should mediate your family law issues, whether those are divorce issues or post-judgment issues. Mediation is an excellent way to reach resolution without spending a ton of money and without going to court a bunch of times and arguing left and right over every issue. Recently, I had a case, and it looked like it was heading towards litigation, and the parties were really far apart on every issue. They had financial issues, which involved real estate holdings, business interests, stock options, retirement accounts, and the parties could not see eye to eye on any of these issues. Early in the process, my adversary and I discussed going to mediation, and we selected a great mediator, and our clients agreed to go to mediation, and literally, within three sessions of mediation, we resolved the case. We resolved the entire case, which would have taken over a year and may have been a ten-fold in costs to litigate. The parties were able to come up with creative solutions with our help, of course, and the mediator’s help, which the court would’ve never ever implemented in a case such as this.

Mediation is great because the parties feel like they are part of the process. They’re negotiating. They’re in an environment where they can come up with solutions and throw out ideas and know it’s confidential. Those ideas and thoughts can’t be used against them. They reach resolutions that they decide, not a judge deciding. They decide this is the resolution, and what’s great about it is people all the time, way more often, are going to actually follow and comply what they agreed to rather than if a judge gives them a decision, and they want to appeal it, or they want to try to find a way around it. Mediation is great.

3) Mediation Parenting

Mediation is an excellent alternative to litigation in many areas of divorce and post-divorce matters. Many people think that mediation is mostly used for financial matters and don’t really think about mediation for custody and parenting time matters. I think that mediation is the perfect forum to discuss and resolve parenting time and custody issues whether that’s in a divorce or post-divorce. The best thing about mediation for parenting time and custody issues is that the mediator and the parties can work together in an environment outside the courtroom that focuses on the best interests of the children. Except in extreme circumstances, most parents want what is best for their child. Sometimes they just have a problem reaching those goals, and sometimes their emotions get in the way of clear thinking.

The process of mediation and selecting the right mediator or selecting the right mediator in the process of mediation is critical. The mediator needs to listen to both partners, realize the both parties have most likely some emotional issues when it comes to their children and the other side, and really get to the root of the problem. Unless the parties can be assured that the mediator and the other side are listening to their concerns, you won’t be able to get to the next level of resolving the issues. In many cases where the conflict is high, you have to start slower, and you work on a month at a time. You work on calendars of who’s going to spend what time with the children, again, always focusing on what’s best for the children considering their age, considering their activities, their school, their social engagements. Once the parties are comfortable with their mediator and know that the mediator and the other side are listening to their concerns, it’s much easier to get to the next step of actually coming up with a schedule for parenting time.

In addition to parenting time, there can be some custody issues. Normally, people are going to have joint legal custody of their children, but that doesn’t mean that they each always have to agree on every single issue. Sometimes people can agree that both parents will have input and be notified of decisions and will be consulted and have the ability to discuss this; sometimes parents will agree that one parent will, for instance, make the end decision in what doctors to bring the child to, and maybe one parent will make the ultimate decision on what extra-curricular activities the child may participate in. In mediation, we can explore these one by one, issue by issue. When left to the courts and the parties litigate custody and parenting time, they tend to dig their heels in the sand a little bit more, and they tend to be less cooperative versus more cooperative with each other. Litigating sometimes brings out the worst in people, whereas I think mediating custody and parenting time issues really bring out the best in people because it needs to be reinforced that the goal is what is in the child’s best interest, not what is in each parent’s best interest, but what is in the child’s best interest.

After the parties are comfortable with the mediator and can express their concerns, and they can express proposals knowing that everything you do in mediation is confidential and can’t be used in a court, I find this is the best alternative. Sometimes in cases that are in a divorce, the court will refer the parties to what we call in-house custody, parenting time mediation, and they do a great job, and sometimes that settles the custody and parenting time issues, but sometimes they need more than what the court can offer, and sometimes there’s just no court case. The parties aren’t in a divorce, or it’s a post-divorce issue, so these types of cases are a perfect fit for mediation and a perfect fit to avoid the emotional and financial toll of litigation. 


Are you or a loved one in the divorce process and are wondering more about our 3 family law tips? Contact an experienced family law attorney at Callagy Law today for a free consultation and case evaluation.

We don’t just care about family law, we care about you.

Like Us on Facebook