What Is Considered a Personal Injury?

What Is Considered a Personal Injury?

What Is a Personal Injury? | New Jersey Personal Injury Attorney | Callagy Law

What is a personal injury? What’s the difference between that and a bodily injury? These are important to know if you’ve suffered an injury. It lets you know when it’s appropriate to hire a New Jersey personal injury attorney.

What Is a Personal Injury?

A personal injury has to do with civil law. If you make a personal injury claim, you’re seeking compensation. This can include physical injuries both temporary and permanent as the result of an accident.

The plaintiff in this case is the person who suffered the injury. In cases where the victim has died due to the injury, their estate becomes the plaintiff.

The defendant in a personal injury lawsuit is the person or entity who bears responsibility – through negligence – for the injury happening.

How Long to File?

States have different limits on the amount of time given to file a personal injury lawsuit in civil court. The statute of limitations in New Jersey is two years from the date the injury occurred.

If the lawsuit doesn’t get in under that two-year window, then the state is extremely unlikely to hear your case. This means you lose your right to compensation. There are rare circumstances that may allow an extension of the deadline, but they should never be expected or taken for granted until approved.

If the injury is the fault of a state government employee or agency, you need to file a formal claim within 90 days of the injury. The government should seek to resolve your claim within six months. If it doesn’t, you can then file a lawsuit. You’ll still need to file the lawsuit itself within two years of the injury.

What About Shared Fault?

The defendant may assert that you hold some responsibility for your injuries. This is called “shared fault.” It can influence the level of compensation you receive in a settlement or decision.

New Jersey assigns a percentage of fault, and reduces the amount of compensation according to the percentage of fault you bear for the accident. This is called a “modified comparative negligence rule.”

In a simple example of this, if you’re owed $10,000 and you’re found to be 25% at fault, your compensation would be reduced by 25% – to $7,500.

What Is a Personal Injury Burden of Proof?

The burden of proof in a personal injury case is not as high as it might be in a criminal case. This is because the primary purpose is to determine who’s at fault and to assign compensation. That said, there is still a burden of proof. Your New Jersey personal injury attorney must prove that the defendant acted negligently in causing the personal injury.

Factors in that negligence can be widespread: a defective product, a car accident, professional malpractice, and premises liability just to name a few.

To prove negligence, you must prove that the defendant 1) owed a duty of care; 2) failed to meet this duty of care; 3) that the defendant’s actions caused the plaintiff’s losses or injuries; and 4) damages are the result of the defendant’s actions.

What Is a Personal Injury Compensation Package?

There are two types of damages awarded in personal injury cases. The first is economic damages. These damages can be directly financially measured. They include medical bills, lost wages, and rehabilitation charges. Each of these have a direct monetary value that can be assigned.

The second type of damages is non-economic. This includes pain and suffering, loss of quality of life, and factors that aren’t so easily assigned a monetary value. Nonetheless, a compensation package assigns a monetary value that can help ease these factors.

What Is Choice No-Fault Car Insurance?

New Jersey uses a “choice no-fault” car insurance system. There are two types of car insurance in the state. Many policies have a “limited right to sue” option. That means it’s a form of no-fault car insurance. It doesn’t matter who caused the accident; any injury resulting from a car accident needs to be claimed under the driver’s Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage.

This limits the ability to sue, but speeds up compensation for out-of-pocket losses. There are certain circumstances where someone who’s injured can sue outside of the no-fault system. If the accident resulted in any of the following, you can step outside the system and still file a lawsuit:

  • Loss of a body part
  • Significant disfigurement
  • Significant scarring
  • Displaced fracture
  • Loss of fetus
  • Permanent injury
  • Death

In addition, PIP does not cover non-economic damages, so you can still file a lawsuit if pain and suffering or other intangible losses apply.

Is There a Compensation Cap?

Do I Have a Personal Injury Claim? | FREE Online Case Evaluation | Callagy Law of New JerseyYou understand the answer to the question, “What is a personal injury?” Now you need to know what you can be owed under New Jersey’s personal injury laws. Compensatory damages will be awarded as a result of damages, injury, and other loss. Since there’s no cap to what someone’s medical expenses might end up being, there’s no real cap to compensatory damages.

Punitive damages are capped, however. These are damages awarded beyond compensation as a way to punish the defendant for negligence. The cap on punitive damages in New Jersey personal injury cases is either $350,000, or five times the total of your compensatory damages. Whichever number is greater become the cap.

When Do You Need a New Jersey Personal Injury Attorney?

It’s wise to consult a New Jersey personal injury attorney in the event of any major injury where another party is at fault. Now, there are many incidents where you may not be entirely sure who’s at fault. An attorney can help you iron this out and make things clearer. They’ll be realistic with you about how strong your case is and what documentation you need to provide to make it stronger.

Most cases are settled rather than going to trial. The stronger your case is and the more fault a defendant bears, the more you can expect out of a settlement.

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for informational purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Your Lions Live Here

Your Lion Lives Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery

  •  How Much Are Denied Claims Costing Providers?

    Posted on 05-26-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  What Is Considered as Income for Child Support?

    Posted on 05-21-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Is Child Support Calculated in New Jersey?

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Family Law

  •  5 Ways to Improve Your Denial Management Process

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  10 Tips for Divorcing Parents – Infographic

    Posted on 05-18-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Do You Write a Parenting Plan?

    Posted on 05-14-2020

    Family Law