Can I Sue Over a Ruined Business Relationship?

Can I Sue Over a Ruined Business Relationship?

Tortious Interference | Ruined Business Relationship | Callagy Law

You’ve worked hard on a business relationship that has proved profitable. One day, someone else comes along and ruins it for you – maybe they don’t like you, maybe they are jealous, maybe they have their own purpose and your ruined business relationship is simply collateral damage. What can you do about it?

Tortious Interference with Contract or Business Expectancy

The most obvious cause of action is “tortious interference with business expectancy,” or just “interference with contract.” The specific nature of the claim varies between states, but most of them have certain common elements including:

  1. You have to be involved in a business relationship with another party. There doesn’t always need to be a contract, although that is typically the case. It should be something in which you have, at a minimum, some reasonable expectation of a profitable relationship. Also, the interfering party can’t be part of the underlying contract. That is, a person can’t be sued under tortious interference for interfering in their own contract. If there is a manager at the company with which you’re doing business who takes their business elsewhere, for example, there is typically no claim.
  2. The interfering party must know about your relationship. If the interfering party has no idea that you exist, then they are typically immune for suit for their actions.
  3. The interfering party must know that they are interfering with your business relationship, although the interference usually does not need to be their goal. It is typically enough that they knew in advance that their actions would harm your business relationship.
  4. The interfering party must actually interfere, of course.
  5. The interference must be improper. This is typically the aspect of the claim that causes the most controversy. Simple competition is not improper – a rival company is entitled to attempt to steal clients. The means and motive are highly relevant here. The use of bribery or extortion to poach clients may constitute improper conduct. Likewise, interfering with contracts to put a company out of business because of political beliefs might also constitute impropriety.
  6. The interference must cause harm. Some states require termination of the business relationship, while others require only that the contract become more difficult to perform.
    If you are faced with what you belief is improper and unethical behavior that has damaged your business, I urge you to consult with a business litigation attorney as quickly as possible.

Written by Callagy Law Partner Jeffrey Zane, Esq.

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for informational purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

Your Lions Live Here

Your Lion Lives Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery

  •  How to Deal With a Peer Review

    Posted on 07-13-2020

    Insurance Claims Personal Injury

  •  Good Billing Practices

    Posted on 07-13-2020

    Insurance Claims Personal Injury

  •  How Much Are Denied Claims Costing Providers?

    Posted on 05-26-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  What Is Considered as Income for Child Support?

    Posted on 05-21-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Is Child Support Calculated in New Jersey?

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Family Law

  •  5 Ways to Improve Your Denial Management Process

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

Callagy Law 5 stars - based on 286 reviews
Callagy Law