The Statute of Limitations: When Fairness and Justice Demands The Righteous Fail

The Statute of Limitations: When Fairness and Justice Demands The Righteous Fail

The American Justice System does not operate based on who is morally or equitably “right.” Our system would fail if that was the standard upon which the Courts had to base their decisions. Rather, our justice system tries to ensure the orderly resolution of cases based on objective rules and regulations which try to eliminate biased judgment or analysis.  The Statute of Limitation is one such rule. Statutes of Limitation are laws that are passed by the legislature to set the maximum time after an event when legal proceedings may be initiated. They are usually arbitrarily set dates, e.g., 2 years after an automobile accident. When the period of time set by these laws has passed, no matter how strong the claim is, it can no longer be filed and prosecuted. The stated purpose behind these rules is to ensure that cases are brought in a timely manner to ensure prompt resolution and to avoid the risk of “stale” evidence, i.e., memory loss, or document loss or destruction. The Courts enforce these Statutes whether or not the potential litigant has real injuries, and the facts and law supporting their claim for compensation. For many people, these laws may seem extraordinarily unfair or unjust. Whether you agree with the stated purpose of these rules, they are an unavoidable part of our system of justice. The Courts, however, have tried to lessen the harsh blow that strict enforcement of these rules would bring. To this end, State and Federal Courts have interpreted Statutes of Limitation laws to require that the aggrieved party against whom the limitation laws are being enforced to possess a minimum requisite of knowledge sufficient to identify that a wrong occurred and caused injury. What does that mean? You have to know that you had a claim before the limitations clock can start running against you. As such, as a litigant against whom the Statute of Limitation is being sought, it is important to know whether your State has cases, statutes or laws which postpone or “toll” the start of the limitations clock based on your knowledge. Tolling on this basis is often referred to as the “discovery rule.” Furthermore, if you have been defrauded and did not know (or could not have found out through reasonable investigation) that you were defrauded, the Courts may further toll the Statute of Limitations until such time as you knew or should have known you were defrauded.  Often, the act of covering up the existence of fraud is referred to as “fraudulent concealment” and is another basis for tolling the Statute of Limitations. What’s more, if fraudulent concealment is established, the litigant may be relieved of the duty to investigate facts that would have revealed the fraud and further postpone the limitations clock until the injured party actually learned about the fraud. To find out more, you can browse free online resources or contact a Callagy Law attorney that can answer your questions about these claims. Learn More About Callagy Law Here: Avvo Vine Pinterest Indeed Yelp LawNearMe Wikipedia Website

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for informational purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Your Lions Live Here

Your Lion Lives Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery

  •  How Much Are Denied Claims Costing Providers?

    Posted on 05-26-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  What Is Considered as Income for Child Support?

    Posted on 05-21-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Is Child Support Calculated in New Jersey?

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Family Law

  •  5 Ways to Improve Your Denial Management Process

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  10 Tips for Divorcing Parents – Infographic

    Posted on 05-18-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Do You Write a Parenting Plan?

    Posted on 05-14-2020

    Family Law