How Do I Protect My Business with a Non-Compete Agreement?

How Do I Protect My Business with a Non-Compete Agreement?

Non-Compete Agreement | Protect Your Business | Arizona Law

If your business uses any kind of employment agreement for your employees or contractors, chances are that you need to protect your business from unfair competition by your employees after their employment with you ends. After all, you are putting a lot of time, money, and energy into training your people to properly represent you and your business when performing their work and communicating with customers.

Fortunately, Arizona law allows you to protect your interest in your customer base by creating enforceable non-compete agreements. A non-compete agreement, also called a restrictive covenant, is a contract which limits an employee’s ability to directly compete with her employer after her employment ends. This is a powerful protection for employers who want to ensure their employees cannot use their employment to gain an unfair competitive advantage in a challenging market when they leave the business.

While non-compete agreements are legal in Arizona, it is important to note that such contracts are “disfavored” by the court system. Arizona is a very business friendly state, and the court system has long supported the rights of individuals to engage in commercial activities. For this reason, non-compete agreements must be narrowly tailored to provide only the minimum restriction necessary to protect a “legitimate interest.” If not narrowly tailored, the entire agreement could be held unenforceable in court.

How Do I Make a Non-Compete Agreement Enforceable?

Creating a narrowly tailored non-compete agreement can be challenging. How do you know if you are limiting its effect to the minimum required to protect a legitimate interest? There are three essential elements that will help you create an enforceable agreement.

Because the non-compete agreement must protect a “legitimate interest”, you need to determine what you are trying to protect. An employer cannot just protect against competition for the sake of preventing competition. There are a few questions to ask yourself to determine what interest you are trying to protect, what restrictions to impose to protect it, where to impose them, and for how long.

  1. What skills am I teaching my employees?
  2. How long does it take me to train my employees and equip them with these skills?
  3. What services am I providing to my customers?
  4. Where are my customers generally located?

Once you have determined what interests you need to protect, you can take steps to ensure those interests are actually protected.

One of the most common examples of a “legitimate interest” that an employer can protect is its customer base. To explain the essential elements of a non-compete agreement, let’s look at protecting your customer base.

3 Essential Elements of a Non-Compete Agreement

Having identified the legitimate interest (i.e., protecting the customer base), there are three essential elements of a non-compete agreement that must be included and tailored to protect that interest:

  1. A non-compete agreement must contain a geographic limitation. You will never be able to prevent a former employee from competing everywhere, but you can prevent direct competition within a specific and defined area. Usually, definitions read something like, “within 50 miles of the employer’s place of business” or “within 10 miles of any location where the employee performed services on behalf of the employer”. Whatever geographic area is covered, it is essential that it is well and clearly identified.
  2. A non-compete agreement must contain a duration limitation. You will never be able to prevent competition for all time, but you can preclude competition for a period of months or years. Non-compete agreements commonly contain a one or two year limitation, but can be longer or shorter, depending on the nature of the competition that is being prohibited. If the agreement does not contain a time limitation, it will not hold up in an Arizona court.
  3. The specific conduct prohibited by the non-compete agreement must be narrow in scope. This means that it needs to be no more restrictive than necessary to protect the legitimate interest. For example, if your employee is medical equipment salesman, you cannot prevent the employee for taking any employment in “sales”. You likely can prevent him from selling “medical equipment”, but that is a specific niche that protects the employer’s interest. Such an employer would have no legitimate interest in preventing the employee from selling cars.

Remember, if your non-compete agreement is challenged in court, the judge is going to be examining the agreement for “reasonableness.” You must make sure the agreement is reasonable – that is, not too broad in time, scope, or prohibited conduct. If you are not overzealous in your drafting, you have a much better chance of having an enforceable agreement.

What Is Arizona’s Blue Pencil Rule?

In creating your non-compete agreement, it is important to remember that Arizona follows what is often called the “blue pencil rule.” This is a legal rule that permits a court to “blue pencil” a non-compete agreement to remove or limit grammatically severable and unenforceable provisions. Importantly, not all non-compete agreements are subject to the blue pencil rule.
For a court to exercise the blue pencil rule, the terms of the non-compete agreement must clearly state that the terms are “severable”, which means that unenforceable portions can be eliminated without invalidating the entire contract. If the agreement is not clearly severable, then a court cannot blue pencil the non-compete agreement.

Most often, the blue pencil rule is used to reduce the geographic scope or time duration of the non-compete agreement to the minimal amount of time required. Often, a well-drafted agreement will provide for several geographic limitations and time durations, stating that the broadest one that is enforceable will apply. This is an important consideration to keep in mind during the drafting process to ensure that you are able to protect your non-compete agreement even if challenged.

Do I Need an Attorney to Draft My Non-Compete Agreement?

While, strictly speaking, you can draft a contract without an attorney’s input and advice, this is not recommended. My rule of thumb is, if you have to ask “do I need an attorney for…” the answer is always yes. There is no reason why you should have to guess at how to put together a non-compete agreement. A professional’s help is well worth it.

If you choose to draft your own agreement, however, be sure to follow the guidelines above. It will help you to make an agreement that will stand up in court and protect the business that you have worked so hard to build.

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for informational purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

About This Author - Brian Williamson

A California native, Brian Williamson relocated to the Valley of the Sun in 2010. In no time at all, he fell in love with Arizona’s verdant deserts, forested mountains, and cool lakes. Like many in the Phoenix area, he is thrilled to be living this southwestern paradise. Brian is an accomplished litigator with more than fifty (50) civil trials under his belt. In addition to championing his clients in the…...

Your Lions Live Here

Your Lion Lives Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery

  •  How Much Are Denied Claims Costing Providers?

    Posted on 05-26-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  What Is Considered as Income for Child Support?

    Posted on 05-21-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Is Child Support Calculated in New Jersey?

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Family Law

  •  5 Ways to Improve Your Denial Management Process

    Posted on 05-19-2020

    Medical Revenue Recovery

  •  10 Tips for Divorcing Parents – Infographic

    Posted on 05-18-2020

    Family Law

  •  How Do You Write a Parenting Plan?

    Posted on 05-14-2020

    Family Law