CALL US: 201-261-1700
PIP Callagy Law

The Bucket 4 “Carve Out”


After searching various sources, we have found many people have questions when it comes to Medical Revenue Recovery, PIP, Workers Compensation, and Commercial Insurance. The following article was written by Callagy Law’s Legal Team, and will focus on many common questions and concerns surrounding new developments, legal matters, and other procedures within the field of healthcare law and medical revenue recovery. Our mission is to answer any questions and give knowledge to many different aspects of these matters

 

This blog is a little bit “inside baseball,” in that it’s a hyper technical explanation look at a concept in the world of bundling.  If you’re a PIP practitioner, however, or deal with ASCs and Hospitals, this is an important concept that could lead to a much larger amount of recovery/reimbursement for ASCs or Hospitals

 

When DOBI updated the PIP regulations (effective 1/4/13) the update included a new section on the “bundling” of outpatient surgical services.  Specifically, N.J.A.C. 11:3-29.5(a)(1-8) and N.J.A.C. 11:3-29.5(b) (which incorporates (a)(1-8)) inform providers and carriers which services are considered “bundled” and are not separately reimbursable.

 

The code, in relevant part, reads as follows:

 

11:3-29.5 Outpatient surgical facility fees

  • ASC facility fees are listed in Appendix, Exhibit 1, by CPT code. Codes that do not have an amount in the ASC facility fee column are not reimbursable if performed in an ASC.  The ASC facility fee include services that would be covered if the services were furnished in a hospital on an inpatient or outpatient basis, including:

 

  1. Use of operating and recovery rooms, patient preparation areas, waiting rooms, and other areas used by the patient or offered for use to persons accompanying the patient;
  2. All services and procedures in connection with covered procedures furnished by nurses, technical personnel and others involved in the patient’s care;
  3. Drugs, biologicals, surgical dressings, supplies, splints, casts, appliances, and equipment;
  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic items and service. Appendix, Exhibit 1 indicates those CPT codes that, according to Medicare (see: www.cms.gov/ASCPayment/ASCRN/list.asp, CMS-1504-FC, Exhibit AA), are considered ancillary services that are integral to surgical procedures and are not permitted to be reimbursed separately in an ASC. Appendix, Exhibit 7 indicates those services that, according to Medicare are considered ancillary services that according to Medicare (see:

D1.pdf) are integral to surgical procedures and are not permitted to be  reimbursed separately in a HOSF;

  1. Administrative, recordkeeping, and housekeeping items and services;
  2. Blood, blood plasma, platelets, etc.;
  3. Anesthesia materials, including the anesthetic itself, and any materials, whether disposable or re-usable, necessary for its administration; and
  4. Implantable DME and prosthetics.

 

(b)        HOSF fees are listed on subchapter Appendix, Exhibit 7 by CPT code. The hospital outpatient surgical facility fee is the maximum that can be reimbursed for outpatient procedures performed in an HOSF. The hospital outpatient facility fees in Appendix Exhibit 7 include services that  would be covered if furnished in a hospital on an inpatient basis, including those set forth in (a)1 through (8) above.

 

(a)(1-8), which I’ll colloquially refer to as the “8 buckets,” essentially states that each bucket is included in the main surgical procedure that was performed in the ASC or Hospital on that particular date of service, and that the type of service described by that bucket is not separately reimbursable, since DOBI has already included reimbursement for such services in the price of the ain surgical code on the appropriate fee schedule.

 

There is a catch, however.  N.J.A.C. 11:3-29.5(a)(4) states:

 

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic items and service.

Appendix, Exhibit 1 indicates those CPT codes that, according to Medicare … are considered ancillary services that are integral to surgical procedures and are not permitted to be reimbursed separately in an ASC.

Appendix, Exhibit 7 indicates those services that, according to Medicare  are considered ancillary services that according to Medicare… are integral to surgical procedures and are not permitted to be  reimbursed separately in a HOSF;

 

Callagy Law’s PIP attorneys have been successful in arguing that bucket 4 actually is actually a “carve out,” and should be read and interpreted differently than the other 7 buckets.  Our attorneys argue that bucket 4 requires a carrier to not simply state that all diagnostic and therapeutic items and services are automatically included in the main surgical procedure; rather, the carrier must first identify the diagnostic and therapeutic items and services and then proceed to the appropriate fee schedule (Exhibit 1 for ASCs, and Exhibit 7 for Hospitals) to determine whether those services are, in fact, bundled.

 

There is an entire column in Exhibit 7 (The Hospital Outpatient Surgical Facility Fee Schedule – “HOSF”), for example, titled “Packaged Item; No Separate Payment.”  Our argument is that DOBI is directing providers and carriers to examine Exhibit 7 to see whether the particular diagnostic/therapeutic services being provided in a particular case are marked as bundled.  (see screenshot of Exhibit 7 below)

CPT HCPCS

Many diagnostic/therapeutic codes on the HOSF do have indicators in the column meaning that they are bundled, but many codes either have no indicator, or do not appear on the HOSF at all.  In those cases, it is the position of the Callagy Law PIP attorneys that the diagnostic/therapeutic codes ARE entitled to separate reimbursement.

 

These diagnostic/therapeutic codes often add up to hundreds or thousands of dollars in a particular outpatient surgery, and so mastery of this concept can mean a great deal of additional recoverable money for a particular provider.  This position has been successful with several arbitrators, and the wave of momentum for this argument only seems to be growing stronger.


 

We hope you have found this information helpful and interesting. Please reach out to us here with any questions or comments regarding healthcare legal matters, or if you are a medical provider that has questions regarding Medical Revenue Recovery, PIP, Workers Compensation, and Commercial Insurance.. Feel free to search us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn! Additionally you can subscribe to our daily videos on YouTube.


 

Learn More About Callagy Law Here:

Avvo

Blog

Facebook

YouTube

Pinterest

Indeed

Yelp

LawNearMe

Wikipedia

Website

Write a comment:

Your email address will not be published.

© 2017 CALLAGY LAW

logo-footer

STAY CONNECTED WITH US: