PIP Insurance For Medical Providers

Are you wondering if you should get PIP insurance for medical providers in New Jersey? Watch this video and call our attorneys today.

Question:

With the new rule changes, does PIP make sense as a medical provider in New Jersey?

Answer:

PIP Insurance For Medical Providers One of our clients called the other day and said, “How has New Jersey PIP changed during the pandemic or post-pandemic?” The short answer is there have not been many substantive changes as far as the pandemic goes, but this is a good opportunity to remind all of us of many of the important issues that must be addressed to be successful in PIP.

The first issue is medical documentation. We cannot stress how important it is to have comprehensive medical notes and that all the patient’s symptoms are documented. If the patient was in a prior motor vehicle accident and recovered and has new injuries from the subject motor vehicle accident, we need to have that documented for causality. If a patient does not want to undergo injection treatment and needs more conservative treatment, that should be documented. If the patient wants to delay a surgery but is okay with injection treatment, that should be documented. You sort of get the theme here. There is nothing more valuable than contemporaneous medical records that are comprehensive, truthful and accurate, and that can increase our chance of success with your files.

Another issue that we have is using proper billing issues. You may be familiar with a Medicare doctrine, NCCI, where Medicare declares you will get reimbursed for this code but not that code, and sometimes you need an appropriate modifier for this code, usually the 59 modifier, and also medical records that will support separate reimbursement for that second code. Basically, in our world, DOBI, the Department of Banking and Insurance is our governing body, but DOBI has incorporated the Medicare NCCI edit payment plan. We need to know this. We need to use the appropriate modifiers. See if the medical records can really support separate reimbursement, and that’s a very important issue.

Also, for trauma doctors, if you are performing trauma services, trauma was activated by the hospital, if appropriate, please use a TS modifier because that will provide reimbursement at usual customary and reasonable rates instead of the physician fee schedule. For surgeons who are working in the emergency room, if it’s not a trauma type of surgery but it’s part and parcel of the patient’s emergency room encounter, the ER modifier is important for surgeons to obtain 150% of the physician fee schedule amounts. In these types of issues, if you are a co-surgeon or an assistant, make sure you use the 62 modifier for the co-surgeon; assistants might be 80, 82, AS. See what type of entity or person is doing the assisting. Are you a physician or a non-physician? That will determine which modifier is proper and the reimbursement you would get.

Also, we just want to take this opportunity to say that the patient intake package is critical. That’s when the patient is in the door, so please make sure you get a valid assignment of benefits. When the patient signs it, please review it to make sure everything is filled out because it can be difficult to get a new assignment of benefits when the patient has treated a long time ago.
Basically, the rules really are the same. Our arbitrating body forthright has never stopped doing hearings during the pandemic. We now have Zoom hearings, which I think are wonderful, and we represent our providers very, very well. It feels like we’re in person. It’s very, very effective, and hopefully we will continue with that mode as an option. That’s it for now. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Callagy Law. Thank you so much.


Do you have questions about PIP insurance for medical providers? Contact experienced New Jersey Medical Revenue Recovery Attorneys at Callagy Law today for a free legal consultation and case evaluation.

Like Us on Facebook