Does Child Support End When My Kids Go To College?

Does Child Support End When My Kids Go To College?

Often times when a client comes to see me because one or more of their children are now going to college, they ask me “how much will my child support go down?”  Unfortunately, I have to break the news to them that there is no presumption that your child support obligation will decrease because your son or daughter is about to attend college.  Yes, a child’s attendance at college is a change of circumstances which warrants a review of the child support obligation.  However, every case is fact sensitive and the circumstances for each family will determine if a direct child support obligation should be reduced when a child is set to attend college.

Living at Home & Commuting to go to School

New Jersey utilizes the Child Support Guidelines to establish child support for children under the age of eighteen years old, living at home and with parents who have certain gross income thresholds.  The Child Support Guidelines are not intended to determine support for children attending college.  One of the reasons that the Child Support Guidelines are not utilized for children attending college is many costs associated with college attendance (like room, food, transportation) are included in the Child Support Guidelines awards.  Therefore, a parent paying child support under the Child Support Guidelines and part of a child’s college expenses is forced to make duplicate expenditures for the child.

However, when a child is living at home with mom or dad and commuting to college, the inequity of a parent paying duplicate expenditures is eliminated.  So, New Jersey law permits the application of the Child Support Guidelines to establish child support for a college student over the age of eighteen and who is commuting to college.  In my experience, most courts will apply the Child Support Guidelines under such circumstances as it is the easiest method to set the child support obligation.

Living Away from Home

When a child attends college and is living away from home during the school year, parents, attorneys and the court (if necessary) must assess all applicable facts and circumstances.  An analysis of the student’s needs and abilities (including a student’s ability to work), as well as, parental financial flexibility or constraints must be undertaken.

Some of those child support expenses that remain even with a child living away from home and attending school may include, but are not limited to: transportation (maintenance, gasoline, parking, alternative travel); furniture (lamps, bed, dorm set-up and small appliances); clothing; linens and bedding; luggage; haircuts; telephone; supplies (paper, pens, calculators); sundries (such as cleaning supplies, laundry detergent); toiletries (soap, shampoo); insurance (automobile, health, personal property); entertainment for college events and organizations; and, spending money.

However, what is clear for our case law is that a reduction in child support is not a foregone conclusion.  Traditional expenses associated with college attendance like, tuition, meal plans, registration fees, lab costs, housing, books and computer costs may indeed lessen the child support needs for a student in certain arears (food, transportation, housing, etc.).  Yet, our courts have held that “common sense” dictates that a college student requires more for support than a student in high school.

Contact Callagy Law

If you, a friend or a family member are having any family law related challenges, please call Callagy Law at (201) 261-1700 and speak to one of our family law attorneys.  Our attorneys will provide you with the caring, urgent and aggressive representation that is absolutely necessary to assure that you understand the process, your questions are answers and your rights are protected.

In Your Service,

Brian McCann, Esq. 

Partner, Family Law

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for entertainment purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

About This Author - Brian McCann

Brian is a member of the New Jersey State Bar Association, Family Law Section, the New York State Bar Association, Family Law Section, Bergen County Bar Association and a member of the Bergen County Family Law Committee and former co-chairman of the Bergen County Family Law Committee.  Brian is a former law clerk of the Superior Court of New Jersey, Family Part, Bergen County, under Hon. Edward V. Torack (retired).…...

Your Lions Live Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery