Can A Medical Provider Challenge a PIP Decision?

Can A Medical Provider Challenge a PIP Decision?

Callagy Law: Medical Revenue Recovery Law Firm

Callagy Law attorneys can assist medical providers including doctors, chiropractors, physical therapists, ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals, who are dissatisfied with PIP arbitration denials or awards.  An arbitration award or denial may be challenged on several grounds, including but not limited to, the following: the denial or award was not consistent with controlling laws and regulations; the denial or award contains computation, clerical or typographical errors; the arbitrator failed to consider claims presented at the time of the hearing or in the parties’ submissions; the arbitrator committed prejudicial error by erroneously applying law to the issues and facts presented.

Requesting A Modification or Clarification:

There are three course of action that Callagy Law PIP attorneys can take on behalf of medical providers who are dissatisfied with an arbitration award or denial. First, Callagy Law PIP attorneys can file a request for modification or clarification of an arbitration award in the arbitrator forum, known as Forthright, which was selected by the State of New Jersey to administer No-Fault Insurance PIP arbitrations under the New Jersey Automobile Insurance Cost Reduction Act.  Forthright Rule 24 “Modification/Clarification of Award” permits a medical provider to request the following: a clarification of the award; a correction of any clerical, typographical or computational errors; or consideration claims presented to the arbitrator at the time of the hearing or in the parties’ submissions that were omitted from the award.  A request for clarification or modification of an award must be made within 45 days after the date of Forthright’s letter sending the award to the parties.

Appealing:

Second, Callagy Law PIP attorneys may file an appeal of an award or denial to a panel of three (3) designated arbitrators in the Forthright forum.  Forthright Rule 25 “Appeals to 3 DRP Panel” permits a medical provider to file an appeal to a 3 arbitrator panel within 35 days of the date of Forthright’s letter sending the award to the parties.  Forthright Rule 25 provides as follows:

Any party may appeal an Award or an Order granting dismissal to a panel of 3 designated DRPs on the No-Fault panel, none of which rendered the Award or Order being appealed.  An Award or Order granting dismissal may be vacated, modified, or corrected pursuant to N.J.S.A 2A:23A-13. For an on-the-papers case only, a party may also challenge the appointment of the DRP for reasonable cause as described in Rule 33 as part of the appealA majority of the panel must make all determinations.  

An appeal must be submitted to Forthright within 35 days of the date of Forthright’s letter sending the Award or Order granting dismissal to the parties. In the event a request for Modification/Clarification was made, the time to file the appeal will be 35 days from the date of Forthright’s letter sending the Modification/ Clarification Order to the parties.  The appellant shall simultaneously serve the appeal upon all named parties by certified mail, return receipt requested, or by personal service, or by means of electronic service as may be designated by the party to be served.

The appeal shall be submitted on a completed Request for Appeal form and must contain a copy of the Award or Order granting dismissal in issue and a copy of any Modification/Clarification Order issued in the case.  The appeal must be accompanied by payment of the administrative fee.  Appeals will be decided solely on documents submitted with the Request for Appeal or appeal response. All other parties shall have 55 days from the date of Forthright’s letter sending the Award or Order granting dismissal to the parties in which to file a submission regarding the appeal.   Any Request for Appeal or response received by Forthright outside the above deadlines will not be submitted to the DRP panel.

Forthright shall forward copies of timely appeal submissions to the DRP panel for determination.  The panel shall issue the Appellate Award within 60 days of Forthright’s submission to the panel.  Forthright will notify the DRP who rendered the original Award that an appeal has been requested.

Filing an Order to Show Cause:

Third, Callagy Law PIP attorneys may file an Order to Show Cause in Superior Court to vacate or modify an arbitration award.  An award may be vacated, modified or corrected pursuant to the controlling law on applications to court for review of an award, N.J.S.A. 2A:23A-13.    The time frame for pursuing an Order to Show Cause in Superior Court is within 45 days after the award is delivered or within 30 days after receipt of a modification or clarification of the award order.   A decision of the arbitrator will be deemed final if there is substantial evidence to support the decision.  An award shall be vacated if the court finds that the rights of the party were prejudiced by any of the following:

(1) Corruption, fraud or misconduct in procuring the award;
(2) Partiality of an umpire appointed as a neutral;
(3) In making the award, the umpire’s exceeding their power or so imperfectly executing that power that a final and definite award was not made;
(4) Failure to follow the procedures set forth in this act, unless the party applying to vacate the award continued with the proceeding with notice of the defect and without objection; or
(5) The umpire’s committing prejudicial error by erroneously applying law to the issues and facts presented for alternative resolution.

There is a strong judicial preference to uphold an arbitrator’s award. The New Jersey Supreme Court has adopted a very narrow standard of review for these decisions, limiting the circumstances under which a court may vacate an arbitration award.  The Courts of the State of New Jersey have long recognized arbitration as a favored method for resolving disputes. The public policy underlying the Arbitration Act, N.J.S.A. 2A:24-1 to -11, provides for finality and limited judicial involvement.   Consequently, a reviewing court may not substitute its own judgment for that of an arbitrator, regardless of the court’s view of the correctness of the arbitrator’s interpretation.

Do You Consider Yourself a Curious Person And Want to Learn More? Contact Callagy Law.

Callagy Law attorneys can assess which appeal method is most appropriate on a case by
case basis dependent upon the particular facts and circumstances of each case.

In your service,

Lynne Goldman, Esq.

Attorney, Medical Revenue Recovery

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for entertainment purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

About This Author - Lynne Goldman

Lynne Goldman is an associate in Callagy Law’s Medical Revenue Recovery group. Lynne represents physicians, surgeons, chiropractors, physical therapists, hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers and MRI facilities seeking reimbursement for personal injury protection benefits (“PIP” benefits).  Lynne is dedicated to serving the best interests of her health care provider clients and has personally recovered over $6 million in PIP reimbursements from insurance companies.  Lynne has significant litigation experience including drafting pleadings…...

Your Lions Live Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery